fbpx

Help! My Kindergartener Can’t Read. Here’s What You Can Do About It.

Help! My Kindergartener Can't Read. Here's What You Can Do About It.

If you have a kindergartener that is struggling to read, don't worry - you are not alone. In fact, according to the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), about 66% of fourth-graders are reading at or above grade level. When your kindergartener is having Difficulty reading, it can be a cause of great concern for parents. You may feel like you are doing something wrong, or that your child is doomed to a life of illiteracy. This is not the case! There are a lot of people out there who know what it's like to be in your shoes. The important thing to remember is that with all the incredible resources out there today, the most important thing to do is to practice. We have created a guide to help you start getting your kindergartener on the right track toward reading.

Help a Kindergartener to read

How to Help a Kindergartner that can't read

 

Here are techniques to help a Kindergartner that can't read :

 

-Read to them: This is the most important activity you can do to help your child develop reading skills. Make it a part of your daily routine to read aloud together for 20 minutes or more.

-Encourage them to read on their own: Provide materials that are interesting and at their level, such as easy readers, comics, magazines, and short stories. Set aside time each day for them to read independently.

-Make it fun: Playing games, singing songs, and acting out stories are all great ways to help your child develop a love for reading.

-Help them sound out words: When your child comes across a word they don't know, help them sound it out. This will help them to start to understand how the written word works.

Help a Kindergartener

Interactive Decodable Stories are helpful

 

Here is why interactive decodable stories are helpful :

 

-The stories are short

-The words are repeated multiple times throughout the story

-The words follow a simple pattern

-There is an interactive component that allows the child to practice what they have learned

 

Some examples of interactive decodable stories are: -"The Cat in the Hat" by Dr. Seuss -"Green Eggs and Ham" by Dr. Seuss -"Fox in Socks" by Dr. Seuss

 

These books are available online, or you can check them out from your local library.

Interactive Decodable Stories are helpful

 

Here is why interactive decodable stories are helpful :

 

-The stories are short

-The words are repeated multiple times throughout the story

-The words follow a simple pattern

-There is an interactive component that allows the child to practice what they have learned

 

Some examples of interactive decodable stories are: -"The Cat in the Hat" by Dr. Seuss -"Green Eggs and Ham" by Dr. Seuss -"Fox in Socks" by Dr. Seuss

 

These books are available online, or you can check them out from your local library.

Help a Kindergartener to read

Teaching kindergarten reading

 

These are tips to work with your child whether they are at home or in the classroom.

 

If you think your child may be having difficulty reading, the best thing to do is talk to their teacher. Teachers are trained in identifying early reading difficulties and can give you specific advice on how to help your child at home.

 

There are also many great resources available online and in libraries. Here are a few of our favorites:

 

- The Reading Machine by Barbara deRubertis: This step-by-step guide walks you through everything from teaching the alphabet to sounding out words.

- What Your Kindergartener Needs to Know by E.D. Hirsch: This book covers the basics of reading, writing, and math that every child should know before starting kindergarten.

 

Start by practicing the alphabet with your child every day. Help them sound out words and read simple sentences. Make reading fun by taking turns reading stories aloud, acting out scenes from books, or coming up with your own endings to stories. Encourage your child to keep reading by letting them choose their own books and providing plenty of praise when they read well. With a little patience and practice, your child will be reading in no time!

 

What else you can do if my child is not reading at grade level?

 

If you have exhausted all of the resources available to you and your child is still not reading at grade level, there are a few other things you can do. You can talk to your child's teacher about what they are seeing in class and if they have any suggestions. You can also look into hiring a tutor who specializes in helping children learn to read. The most important thing is to not give up and to keep working with your child. With a little extra help, they will be reading in no time!

 

If you are concerned that your child may have a learning disability, the first step is to talk to their doctor. They can rule out any medical conditions that may be causing the delay and refer you to a specialist if they think it would be beneficial.

 

If you have tried all of the above and are still struggling, reach out to us! We are here to help and can offer additional resources and support. Contact us today to learn more.

 

What are some signs that my child is not reading at grade level?

 

There are a few signs that may indicate your child is not reading at grade level. If they are struggling to sound out words, having trouble understanding what they read, or are reading very slowly, these may be red flags. If you notice any of these things, it is important to reach out for help so that your child can get back.

 

What are good words to start with sounding out words?

 

There are a few good words to start with when sounding out words. Words that have a short vowel sound, such as "cat" or "dog," are usually good for beginning readers. Once your child is able to read these easily, you can move on to longer words. Sounding out words is a great way to help your child learn to read.

 

By following the steps above, you will be well on your way to helping your child learn to read. Don't forget, the most important thing is to practice, practice, practice! With a little extra help and a lot of patience, your child will be reading in no time.

 

Summary

 

When it comes to teaching kids how to read, there are a lot of different techniques that can be effective. However, one of the best things that you can do is simply encourage them to read as much as possible. This means setting aside some time each day for reading, whether it’s before bed or first thing in the morning. It’s also important to create a reading-friendly environment in your home by stocking up on books, magazines, and other reading materials. And finally, make sure to praise your child when they show interest in reading or make progress with their skills. By following these steps, you’ll be well on your way to helping your child become a strong reader.

 

If you have any questions or would like additional resources, please reach out to us. We are here to help! Contact us today to learn more.

 

Happy reading!

Start Teaching Reading for Free Now!

Access Level 1’s four interactive stories and the accompanying supplemental resources to teach elementary students how to read. No credit card is needed. Join the 42,635 teachers and students using our reading program.

Wordpress Social Share Plugin powered by Ultimatelysocial
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]
[class^="wpforms-"]