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How to Teach Phonics to Struggling Readers

How to Teach Phonics to Struggling Readers

Phonics is the pathway to reading success - and for struggling readers, it can also be the biggest obstacle.

 

If you’re the parent or educator of a struggling reader, you’ve likely done your research. You know that phonics instruction is crucial for early readers, but finding the “right” decodable books and phonics readers can be daunting. To streamline your process, we’ve identified some of the best phonics intervention activities to support and re-energize a struggling reader.

How to Teach Phonics to Struggling Readers

Phonics Intervention Activities

 

Imagine: your struggling reader just came home from school with a list of phonics intervention activities. Sounds a bit intense, right? While this language may seem intimidating, phonics interventions are actually designed to empower young readers with the skills and confidence they need to read more complicated texts.

 

So, what exactly is a phonics intervention?

 

A phonics intervention is any activity that seeks to improve a student’s knowledge and application of phonics: the reading method of connecting letters and their sounds. According to the National Reading Panel, phonics intervention activities should be explicit, systematic, taught in small groups, and focused on specific skills: for example, focusing on one or two types of phoneme manipulations rather than multiple types.

Teach Phonics to Struggling Readers

Some of the best phonics intervention activities include:

  • Phoneme Manipulation Activities. Phoneme manipulation is crucially important when teaching phonics to struggling readers - and for many students, it’s also one of the most difficult skills they’ll practice!
  • Phonics Books & Phonics Readers, and Decodable Books.
  • Hands-on Reading Strategies.

 

To make these activities easier for readers and their teachers, let’s cover some key questions & their answers.

 

What is phoneme manipulation?

 

Phoneme manipulation describes the ability to change individual phonemes (the smallest sound units) in a word. Change /p/ in “top” to /b/, and - like magic - you’ve manipulated a phoneme!

 

What are the types of phoneme manipulation?

 

There are three main types of phoneme manipulation:

  • Phoneme Addition: for example, begin with the word “ray” and add /g/ to the front of the word, resulting in “gray”
  • Phoneme Deletion: for example, begin with the word “plant” and take away /l/, resulting in “pant” (this is a bit trickier, as you’re deleting the second phoneme from the consonant blend /pl/!)
  • Phoneme Substitution: for example, changing the /w/ in “wall” to /b/, resulting in “ball”

 

Teachers and parents can give these challenges orally, which adds variety and excitement to daily reading practice: a huge bonus for struggling readers.

Teach Phonics to Struggling Readers

Phonics Books for Struggling Readers

 

Whether you’re searching for decodable books or phonics readers, it’s overwhelming to sift through the hundreds of books designed for struggling readers. But just like other phonics interventions, the best phonics books should focus on the following reading skills:

  • Before moving onto more complicated phonics books, students’ earliest books should focus on both short and long vowels. Because every single syllable of every single word includes a vowel sound, this is not a skill to skimp on!
  • CVC and sight words. Sight words are high-frequency words that can’t be sounded out, while CVC words start and end with a consonant and contain a vowel in the middle. When reading phonics books, focus on these word categories before moving onto more difficult phonics patterns.
  • Search for phonics patterns. Get your red pen out: it’s time to mark up your decodable book! Identify a common phonics pattern, then have a struggling reader mark the pattern in their phonics book. They’ll be mentally prepared to read these phonics patterns in-context, which can be difficult when they don’t have a chance to see & mark them beforehand.
    • Because decodable readers focus on a single phonics pattern or word family, they’re an excellent choice for many struggling readers.
Teaching Phonics to Struggling Readers

Hands-On Reading Activities for Struggling Readers

 

For struggling readers, tuning into all the senses is key. After reading a decodable book, readers can practice new words with some of the following hands-on phonics activities:

  • Bubble Wrap Flash Cards: Place flashcards on bubble wrap on the floor. Reader reads the card - then stomps on it! Educational and satisfying.
  • Word Slide: As readers sound out a word, have them tap their arm going down while segmenting the sounds. When they’ve successfully sounded out the word, they’ll “slide” their hand down their arm again to blend the sounds together. See an example of this strategy here.
  • Letter Tiles: use magnetic or plastic letter tiles to practice phonemic manipulation. Whether they’re on the fridge or the kitchen table, letter tiles are a fun, budget-friendly, and low-pressure reading activity.

 

Take-Aways:

  • While finding the best phonics interventions can feel overwhelming, supportive adults are encouraged to use a variety of strategies to support struggling readers.
  • To support struggling readers, we recommend a mix of phoneme manipulation activities, phonics readers and decodable books, and hands-on reading activities.

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How to Teach Phonics to Your First Grader

How to Teach Phonics to Your First Grader

Phonics is an essential building block of reading skills. It’s also one of the most challenging parts of teaching a first grade. That’s because reading and writing skills develop at different rates in each child. For example, some children learn letter sounds earlier than others. Some take longer to decode words. Some have a harder time following directions. Teach phonics to a child is a challenging, especially for parents who are new to the homeschooling lifestyle. However, with a little preparation, you can make teaching reading skills to your first grader fun and rewarding.

 

In this blog post, we’ll discuss how to teach your first grader how to read. We’ll also discuss how to teach them how to read phonetically. Once your child has a firm understanding of it, you can work on teaching them how to read phonetically.

 

Teaching your homeschooled child how to read is no different than teaching any other subject. You just have to make sure you take the time to teach them. Even if they’re in first grade.

 

Why Teach Phonics to a Homeschooled Child?

 

tech phonicsThe majority of children learn how to read at a very young age. However, some children learn at a much later age. This can be frustrating for parents and teachers. You might even consider an additional reading intervention. While all of this is certainly understandable, you must remember that reading is a complex skill.

 

Understanding how your child learns, as well as their current skill level, will help you decide when to introduce phonics to them. You’ll also have a better understanding of how to best teach your child so they can catch up and be on even grounds with their peers.

 

The advantage of teaching your child phonics at a younger age is that they are more likely to retain what you teach them. Furthermore, it will be easier for your child to “decode” words when they begin to read on their own.

 

So, why teach your first grader how to read phonics? Let’s discuss.

 

Help Your First Grader Understand the How

 

When you start to teach your first grader how to read, you will want to make sure they understand the “how.”. You can do this by explaining to them what reading is and how it helps them become smarter.

 

Reading is a powerful way for your child to gain knowledge and understand the world around them. Reading, as we all know, is communication. It requires your child to pull from their own experiences as well as the experiences of others.

 

When reading, your child is decoding written words. This means that they are breaking down the letters into sounds. Once your child can “read” the words, they can use what they’ve learned to make sense of what the words mean.

For example, let’s say your child is reading the word “dog.” They might notice that the “g” in “dog” is similar to the “k” in “kat.” So, your child might make the connection between the “g” in “dog” and “k” in “kitten.”

 

This is how reading affects your child’s brain. It allows them to build knowledge and store information. It also gives your child something to think about. This will help them stay focused during school hours, as well as improve their attention span.

 

Teach Your Child the Basics of Phonics

 

When it comes to teaching your child the basics of phonics, you can’t do it too early. It’s important to have a strong foundation in phonics so your child can better understand how to read.

 

By teaching your first grader the basics of phonics, you’re helping them break down the code used for reading. This will make it easier for them to decode words when they begin to read on their own.

 

There are a few ways you can teach your first grader about phonics. Here are some ideas to get you started.

 

Let’s Begin with the Alphabet: The easiest way to introduce the basics of phonics is to start out with the alphabet. Once your child understands how to write each letter of the alphabet, they can learn how to break down each sound it makes.

 

Let’s Say the Alphabet Song: Another way to introduce the basics of phonics is to sing the alphabet song. You can sing the alphabet song with your child while they are sitting in their chair or on the floor with a coloring book and a crayon.

 

Teach Phonics the Right Way

 

Like most skills, teaching your child how to read phonetically is a process of practice. You’ll need to work at it consistently if you want results.

 

When you’re teaching your first grader how to read phonetically, it’s important to remember that they don’t understand the meaning behind the words.

 

You can’t start teaching them phonics by having them understand the meaning behind the words. The meaning will come later. For now, your job is to teach the sounds the letters make.

 

There are a few ways you can go about teaching your first grader phonics. Here are some ideas to get you started.

 

Teach Sounds Before Letters

 

Children learn how to read and write words before they learn how to read letters. You can use this knowledge to your advantage by teaching your child sounds before you teach them letters.

 

For example, let’s say your 1st grader is learning the “b” sound. You can show your child how to make the sound by saying the letter “b” and clapping your hands together. After showing them how to make the sound, you can work on decoding the word “bicycle.”

 

Help Your Child Develop decoding skills: Another important step when teaching your child how to read phonetically is to help them develop decoding skills. Decoding is the process of breaking down words into their individual sounds.

 

For example, you can have your child read the word “cat” out loud and you can break down the letters into sounds. After your child has decoded the letters, you can discuss what the word “cat” sounds like.

 

Teach the "Sight Word" Strategy

 

The “Sight-Word” strategy is one of the most effective ways to teach your first grader how to read phonetically. The idea behind the sight word method is that you show your child only one word and give them a cue to help them identify the word.

 

For example, you can have your child say the word “dog” and then point to the picture of a dog when they say the word. This will help your child associate words with pictures and make it easier for them to read.

 

Wrapping Up: Teaching Phonics as a homeschooled parent

 

Now that you know how to teach your first grader phonics, it’s time to put your knowledge to the test. Get ready to launch into a rigorous homeschooling year. Your first grader will be reading at a level much higher than they were last year.

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Access Level 1’s four interactive stories and the accompanying supplemental resources to teach elementary students how to read. No credit card is needed. Join the 42,635 teachers and students using our reading program.

A Complete Guide on How Phonics Helps Kids Learn to Read

A Complete Guide on How Phonics Helps Kids Learn to Read

Teaching phonics is one of the most important steps in the process in which children learn how to read. Phonics teaches kids how to pronounce, sound out, and combine the sounds of language.

 

Children need to learn this in order to be able to read in front of others and spell new words on their own. Phonics is the method of teaching children how to read by focusing on sounds.

 

Here are a few tips for parents or teachers that want to teach phonics:

 

-Find resources that you can use at home or at school.

 

-Practice, practice practice.

 

-Read books together as a family.

 

In this article you will learn about how phonics can help your child to become a better reader.

What is Phonics?

 

Phonics is the study of the sounds that make up words. Phonics teaches kids how to pronounce, sound out, and blend the sounds of language.

 

Learning phonics will help the children to read out loud in from of other people, as well as allow them to spell new words by themselves. An example would be "c-a-t” spells out “cat."

Why Should Kids Learn Phonics?

 

reading groupsThe importance of teaching phonics to children is often overlooked, but it is very important as it helps them learn to read. By teaching them phonics, kids will learn how to pronounce, sound out, and blend the sounds of language. This will let them read out loud in public and spell out new words on their own.

 

Here are a few tips for parents or teachers that want to teach phonics:

 

-Find resources you can use at home or at school.

 

-Talk about how well students are doing with reading.

 

-Read books together as a family.

How To Teach Phonics -  Learn to Read

 

Teaching phonics is one of the most important steps in teaching children to read.

 

So how do you teach phonics?

 

Here are a few tips for parents or teachers that want to teach phonics:

 

Find resources you can use at home or at school, talk about how well students are doing with reading, and read books together as a family.

Benefits of Teaching Phonics to Kids

 

-Read books together as a family. Teaching phonics is one of the most important steps in teaching children to read.

 

Children need to learn this in order to be able to read in front of others and spell new words on their own.

 

There are a few benefits parents and teachers should know about when they teach children how to read using phonics:

 

-Phonics can help kids build confidence when reading.

 

-It helps them develop an understanding of language that they may not be getting from other curriculums.

 

-Teaching phonics will help children with vocabulary, spelling, writing, and more.

 

-Some research suggests that teaching phonics with sight words can lead to greater success.

Resources for Elementary Teachers

 

-Targets vocabulary and reading comprehension.

 

-Includes lesson plans for teaching different phonics skills.

 

-Provides reading lessons that are aligned with the Common Core Standards.

 

-Includes activities to help students learn new concepts while they have fun One of the first things parents and teachers should do is find resources they can use to help teach phonics. There are many different resources that you can use to teach children, such as letters, games, books and more. Resources are a great way to teach kids how to read because they will be able to get more practice with learning how to sound out words. A good resource for teaching children how to sound out words is a book called Chicka Chicka Boom Boom. This book teaches kids about the alphabet and how each letter has its own sound.

Read Together With Them

 

Your child will need help reading on their own. Find a book that you want to read as a family and then work with them to read it.

 

It's important for kids to pick up words from context and make connections with the world. This is something that you can do when you're reading together. The most important thing you can do is read.

 

By reading together with your child, they will learn to associate words with sounds, as well as how to read and comprehend what they are reading.

 

This helps children know what the letters in words sound like and should be able to tell which position has a letter in a word.

 

Having them read aloud also helps to build their confidence and self-esteem.

Conclusion

 

Reading is an important skill for children to learn. Phonics helps children learn to read by understanding how sounds map to letters and how letters map to words. Teaching phonics is an important step to help children learn how to read.

Start Teaching Reading for Free Now!

Access Level 1’s four interactive stories and the accompanying supplemental resources to teach elementary students how to read. No credit card is needed. Join the 42,635 teachers and students using our reading program.

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